Boy Scout
Advancement
Requirements Changes

Effective January 1, 2007


When there is a conflict between two published lists of requirements, such as Boy Scout Requirements (BSA Publication No. 33215) and a Merit Badge Pamphlet, the requirements book should be considered to be the controlling document, until a newer edition of Boy Scout Requirements is issued, EXCEPT when the merit badge pamphlet has a later issue date.

BSA has been updating ALL of the merit badge pamphlets over the past few years. As of January 1, 2007, only 4 of the pamphlets have editions issued before January 1, 2000 and the requirements for only 8 merit badges have remained completely unchanged during that period. As new pamphlets are issued, when they contain new requirements, Scouts will have the option of starting with the new requirements as soon as the pamphlets are issued, or they may start work using the old requirements until the next edition of Boy Scout Requirements is issued.

BSA will NOT hold the publications of merit badge pamphlets until January each year. Instead, they will issue them as they are completed (and old stocks are exhausted, probably). Then in January, the requirements book will include all revisions to date.

Those Scouts working on any badges using the old requirements and who started before the new books were issued may complete the badge using the old requirements. Those starting work on the badge after the new books are issued, may use either the old or new requirements, at their option. For RANK requirement changes, Scouts must normally meet the CURRENT requirements when they are ready for their Board of Review, unless special rules apply (as was the case for the change in First Class requirements in 2006).

The following Merit Badges have totally new or modified requirements listed in the 2007 edition of Boy Scout Requirements. Note that many of these actually appeared in Merit Badge Pamphlets issued during 2006 after the release of the 2006 edition of Boy Scout Requirements.


REVISED MERIT BADGE REQUIREMENTS

Animal Science
Archaeology
Art
Athletics
Aviation
Camping
Climbing
Cooking
Dentistry
Entrepreneurship
Graphic Arts
Journalism
Personal Fitness
Rowing
Safety
Shotgun Shooting
Snow Sports
Sports
Stamp Collecting
Traffic Safety
Weather


In the revisions below, where the requirements weren't completely rewritten, the wording changes are shown as follows:
New text is in bold GREEN underlined San-serif text like this sentence.
Deleted portions are struck through RED italic text like this sentence.


Animal Science Merit BadgeAnimal Science

The requirements were substantially rewritten.

The requirements now read as follows:

  1. Name four breeds of livestock in each of the following classifications: horses, dairy cattle, beef cattle, sheep, hogs. Tell their principal uses and merits. Tell where the breeds originated.
  2. List five diseases that afflict the animals in each of the classifications in requirement 1. Also list five diseases of poultry. Describe the symptoms of each disease and explain how each is contracted and how it could be prevented.
  3. Explain the major differences in the digestive systems of ruminants, horses, pigs, and poultry. Explain how the differences in structure and function among these four types of digestive tracts affect the nutritional management of these species.
  4. Select one type of animal - beef cow, dairy cow, horse, sheep, goat, or hog, or a poultry flock - and tell how you would properly manage it. Include in your discussion nutritional (feeding) concerns, housing, disease prevention, waste control/removal, and breeding programs if appropriate.
  5. Explain the importance of setting clear goals for any animal breeding program. Tell how purebred lines of animals are produced. Explain the practice of crossbreeding and the value of this practice.
  6. Complete ONE of the following options:

BEEF CATTLE OPTION

  1. Visit a farm or ranch where beef cattle are produced under any of these systems:
    1. Feeding market cattle for harvest
    2. Cow/calf operation, producing cattle for sale to commercial feeders
    3. Producing purebred cattle for sale as breeding stock to others
  2. Talk with the operator to learn how the cattle were handled, fed, weighed, and shipped. Describe what you saw and explain what you learned. If you cannot visit a cattle ranch or farm, view a video from a breed association, or research the Internet (with your parent's permission) for information on beef cattle production. Tell about your findings.
  3. Sketch a plan of a feedlot to include its forage and grain storage facilities, and loading chute for 30 or more fattening steers; or sketch a corral plan with cutting and loading chutes for handling 50 or more beef cows and their calves at one time.
  4. Make a sketch showing the principal wholesale and retail cuts of beef. Tell about the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) dual grading system of beef. Tell the basis of each grade in each system.
  5. Define the following terms: bull, steer, bullock, cow, heifer, freemartin, heiferette, calf.

DAIRYING OPTION

  1. Tell how a cow or a goat converts forage and grain into milk Explain the differences in feeds typically used for dairy cows versus those fed to beef cows.
  2. Make a chart showing the components in cow's milk or goat's milk. Chart the amount of each component.
  3. Explain the requirements for producing grade A milk. Tell how and why milk is pasteurized.
  4. Tell about the kinds of equipment used for milking and the sanitation standards that must be met on dairy farms.
  5. Define the following terms: bull, cow, steer, heifer, springer; buck, doe, kid.
  6. Visit a dairy farm or a milk processing plant. Describe what you saw and explain what you learned. If you cannot visit a dairy farm or processing plant, view a video from a breed or dairy association, or research the Internet (with your parent's permission) for information on dairying. Tell about your findings.

HORSE OPTION

  1. Make a sketch of a useful saddle horse barn and exercise yard.
  2. Tell about the history of the horse and the benefits it has brought to people. Using the four breeds of horses you chose in requirement 1, discuss the different special uses of each breed.
  3. Define the following terms: mare, stallion, gelding, foal, colt, filly; mustang, quarter horse, draft horse, pacer, trotter; pinto, calico, palomino, roan, overo, tobiano.
  4. Visit a horse farm. Describe what you saw and explain what you learned. If you cannot visit a horse farm, view a video from a breed association, or research the Internet (with your parent's permission) for information on horses. Tell about your findings.
  5. Outline the proper feeding of a horse doing light work. Explain why the amount and kind of feed will change according to the kind of horse and the work it does. Describe what colic is, what can cause it, and its symptoms.

SHEEP OPTION

  1. Make a sketch of a live lamb. Show the location of the various wholesale and retail cuts.
  2. Discuss how wools are sorted and graded.
  3. Do ONE of the following:
    1. Raise a lamb from weaning to market weight. Keep records of feed intake, weight gains, medication, vaccination, and mortality. Present your records for review by your counselor.
    2. Visit a farm or ranch where sheep are raised. Describe what you saw and explain what you learned. If you cannot visit a sheep farm or ranch, view a video from a breed association, or research the Internet (with your parent's permission) for information on sheep. Tell about your findings.
  4. Describe some differences between the production of purebred and commercial lambs. Then select two breeds that would be appropriate for the production of crossbred market lambs in your region. Identify which breed the ram should be.
  5. Define the following terms: wether, ewe, ram, lamb.

HOG OPTION

  1. Make a sketch showing the principal wholesale and retail cuts of pork. Tell about the recommended USDA grades of pork. Tell the basis for each grade.
  2. Outline in writing the proper feeding programs used from the breeding of a gilt or sow through the weaning of the litter. Discuss the feeding programs for the growth and finishing periods.
  3. Do ONE of the following:
    1. Raise a feeder pig from weaning to market weight. Keep records of feed intake, weight gains, medication, vaccination, and mortality. Present your records for review by your counselor.
    2. Visit a farm where hogs are produced, or visit a packing plant handling hogs. Describe what you saw and explain what you learned. If you cannot visit a hog production unit or packing plant, view a video from a packer or processor, or research the Internet (with your parent's permission) for information on hogs. Tell about your findings.
  4. Define the following terms: gilt, sow, barrow, boar.

AVIAN OPTION

  1. Make a sketch of a layer house or broiler house showing nests, roosts, feeders, waterers, and means of ventilation. Explain how insulation, ventilation, temperature controls, automatic lights, and other environmental controls are used to protect birds from heat, cold, and bad weather.
  2. Explain why overcrowding is dangerous for poultry flocks.
  3. Tell about the grading of eggs. Tell how broilers (fryers) are graded. Describe the classes of chicken meat.
  4. Do ONE of the following:
    1. Manage an egg-producing flock for five months. Keep records of feed purchased, eggs sold, medication, vaccination, and mortality. Present your records for review by your counselor.
    2. Raise 20 chicks from hatching. Keep records of feed intake, weight gains, medication, vaccination, and mortality. Present your records for review by your counselor.
    3. Visit a commercial avian production facility. Describe what you saw and explain what you learned. If you cannot visit a commercial facility, view a video from a poultry association, or research the Internet (with your parent's permission) for information on poultry production. Tell about your findings.
  5. Define the following terms: hen, rooster, chick, capon; tom, poult.
7) Find out about three career opportunities in animal science. Pick one and find out the education, training, and experience required for this profession. Discuss this with your counselor, and explain why this profession might interest you.

Archaeology Merit BadgeArchaeology

Requirements 4 and 5 were rewritten. Requirement 11 became requirement 10. Requirement 10 became requirement 11 and was rewritten. A minor wording change was made to 9b.

The changes to the requirements read as follows:

  1. Do TWO of the following:
    1. Learn about three archaeological sites located outside the United States.
      Gather research on three archaeology sites located OUTSIDE the United States. Point out each site on a world map. Explain how each site was discovered. Describe some of the information from the past that has been found at each site. Explain how the information gained from the study of these sites answers questions that archaeologists are asking and how the information may be important for modern people. Compare the relative ages of the sites.
    2. Learn about three archaeological sites located within the United States.
      Gather research on three archaeological sites that are WITHIN the United States. Point out each site on a map. Explain how each site was discovered. Describe some of the information from the past that has been found at each site. Explain how the information gained from the study of these sites answers questions that archaeologists are asking and how the information may be important to modern people. Compare the relative ages of the sites.
    3. Visit an archaeological site and learn about it.
      Visit an archaeological site and gather research on it. Explain how the site was discovered. Describe some of the information from the past that has been found at the site. Explain how the information gained from the study of this site answers questions that archaeologists are asking and how the information may be important for modern people. Compare the age of this site with the ages of the other sites you have researched.
      For EACH site you research for options a, b, or c, point it out on a map and explain how it was discovered. Describe some of the information about the past that has been found at each site. Explain how the information gained from the study of these sites answers questions that archaeologists are asking and how the information may be important to modern people. Compare the relative ages of the sites you research.
  2. Choose ONE of the research projects you completed for Requirement 4 and give a short presentation about. Present your findings to a Cub Scout pack, your Scout troop, your school class, or another other group.
  3.  
    1. Use the methods of experimental archaeology to re-create an item or to practice a skill skills from the past. Write a brief report explaining the experiment and its results.
  4. Identify three career opportunities in archaeology and tell what education and experience are required for each.
    11.
    Do ONE of the following:
    1. Research American Indians who live or once lived in your area. Find out about traditional lifeways, dwellings, clothing styles, arts and crafts, and methods of food gathering, preparation, and storage. Describe what you would expect to find at an archaeological site for these people.
    2. Research settlers or soldiers who were in your area at least one hundred years ago. Find out about the houses or forts, ways of life, clothing styles, arts and crafts, and dietary habits of the early settlers, farmers, ranchers, soldiers, or townspeople who once lived in the area where your community now stands. Describe what you would expect to find at an archaeological site for these people.
  5. Identify three career opportunities in archaeology. Pick one and explain how to prepare for such a career. Discuss with your counselor what education and training are required, and explain why this profession might interest you.

Art Merit BadgeArt

Requirement 1 was revised.  Requirements 2, 3, 4, 5, & 7 were deleted and old requirement 6 became requirement 3 (and was revised). New requirements 2, 4, & 5 were added.

The changes to the requirements read as follows:

  1. Tell a story with a picture or pictures or using a 3-D rendering.
  2. Do ONE of the following. Promote a product or an idea with a picture or pictures.
    1. Design something useful. Make a sketch or model of your design and get your counselor's approval before you proceed. Then create a promotional piece for the item using a picture or pictures.
    2. Design a logo. Share your design with your counselor and explain the significance of your logo. Then, with your parent's permission and your counselor's approval, put your logo on Scout equipment, furniture, ceramics, or fabric.
  3. 3. Record in an art medium something you have done or seen.
    4. Decorate something with an original design. Put the design on Scout equipment, furniture, ceramics, or fabric.
    5. Design something useful.
    6.
    Render a subject of your choice in FOUR of these ways:
    1. Pen and ink,
    2. Watercolors,
    3. Pencil,
    4. Pastels,
    5. Oil paints,
    6. Tempera, or
    7. Acrylics,
    8. Charcoal
    9. Computer drawing or painting
  4. 7. Discuss job opportunities in art. With your parent's permission and your counselor's approval, visit a museum, art exhibit, art gallery, artists' co-op, or artist's workshop. Find out about the art displayed or created there. Discuss what you learn with your counselor.
  5. Find out about three career opportunities in art. Pick one and find out the education, training, and experience required for this profession. Discuss this with your counselor, and explain why this profession might interest you.

Athletics Merit BadgeAthletics

The requirements were completely rewritten

The requirements now read as follows:

  1. Show that you know first aid for injuries or illnesses that could occur while participating in athletic events, including sprains, strains, contusions, abrasions, blisters, dehydration, and heat reactions.
  2. Explain the following:
    1. The importance of the physical exam
    2. The importance of maintaining good health habits, especially during training.
    3. The importance of maintaining a healthy diet.
  3. Select an athletic activity to participate in for one season (or four months). Then do the following:
    1. With guidance from your counselor, establish a personal training program suited to the activity you have chosen.
    2. Organize a chart for this activity and monitor your progress during this time.
    3. Explain to your counselor the equipment necessary to participate in this activity, and the appropriate clothing for the season and the locale.
    4. At the end of the season, discuss with your counselor the progress you have made during training and competition and how your development has affected you mentally and physically.
  4. Do the following:
    1. Give the rules for two athletic activities, one of which is the activity you chose for requirement 3.
    2. Discuss the importance of warming up and cooling down.
    3. Explain to your counselor what an amateur athlete is and the differences between an amateur and a professional athlete.
    4. Discuss the traits and importance of good sportsmanship. Tell what role sportsmanship plays in both individual and group athletic activities.
  5. Complete the activities in FOUR of the following groups and show improvement over a three-month period.
    • Group 1: Sprinting
      1. 100-meter dash
      2. 200-meter dash
    • Group 2: Long-Distance Running
      1. 3k run
      2. 5k run
    • Group 3: Long Jump OR High Jump
      1. Running long jump OR running high jump (best of three tries)
      2. Standing long jump OR standing high jump (best of three tries)
    • Group 4: Swimming
      1. 100-meter swim
      2. 200-meter swim
    • Group 5: Pull-Ups AND Push-Ups
      1. Pull-ups in two minutes
      2. Push-ups in two minutes
    • Group 6: Baseball Throw
      1. Baseball throw for accuracy, 10 throws
      2. Baseball throw for distance, five throws (total distance)
    • Group 7: Basketball Shooting
      1. Basketball shot for accuracy, 10 free-throw shots
      2. Basketball throw for skill and agility, the following shots as shown on the diagram
        1. Left-side layup
        2. Right-side layup
        3. Left side of hoop, along the key line
        4. Right side of hoop, along the key line
        5. Where key line and free-throw line meet, left side
        6. Where key line and free-throw line meet, right side
        7. Top of the key
        8. Anywhere along the three-point line.
    • Group 8: Football Kick OR Soccer Kick
      1. Goals from the 10-yard line, eight kicks
      2. Football kick or soccer kick for distance, five kicks (total distance)
    • Group 9: Weight Training
      1. Chest/bench press, two sets of 15 repetitions each
      2. Leg curls, two sets of 15 repetitions each
  6. Do the following
    1. Prepare plans for conducting a sports meet or field day that includes 10activities, at least five of which must come from the groups mentioned in requirement 5. Outline the duties of each official needed and list the equipment the meet will require.
    2. With your parent's and counselor's approval, serve as an official or volunteer at a sports meet to observe officials in action. Tell your counselor about your responsibilities at the meet and discuss what you learned.

Aviation Merit BadgeAviation

The requirements were revised, rearranged, and renumbered.

The changes to the requirements read as follows:

  1. Do the following:
    1. Find out what job opportunities there are in aviation. Describe the qualifications and working conditions of one job in which you are interested. Tell what it offers for reaching your goal in life.
  2. Do TWO of the following:
    1. Take a flight in an aircraft, with your parent's permission. Record the date, place, type of aircraft, and duration of flight, and report on your impressions of the flight.
    2. Under supervision, perform a preflight inspection of a light airplane.
      Visit an airport. After the visit, report on how the facilities are used, how runways are numbered, and how runways are determined to be "active."
    3. Obtain and learn how to read an aeronautical chart. Measure a true course on the chart. Correct it for magnetic variation, compass deviation, and wind drift. Arrive at a compass heading.
      Visit a Federal Aviation Administration facility—a control tower, terminal radar control facility, air route traffic control center, flight service station, or Flight Standards District Office. (Phone directory listings are under U.S. Government Offices, Transportation Department, Federal Aviation Administration. Call in advance.) Report on the operation and your impressions of the facility.
    4.  Using one of many flight simulator software packages available for computers. "fly" the course and heading you established in requirement 2c or another course you have plotted.
      Visit an aviation museum or attend an air show. Report on your impressions of the museum or show.
    5. On a map, mark a route for an imaginary airline trip to at least three different locations. Start from the commercial airport nearest your home. From timetables (obtained from agents or online from a computer, with your parent's permission), decide when you will get to and leave from all connecting points. Create an aviation flight plan and itinerary for each destination.
    6. e. Explain the purposes and functions of the various instruments found in a typical single-engine aircraft: attitude indicator, heading indicator, altimeter, airspeed indicator, turn and bank indicator, vertical speed indicator, compass, navigation (GPS and VOR) and communication radios, tachometer, oil pressure gauge, and oil temperature gauge.
    7. f. Create an original poster of an aircraft instrument panel. Include and identify the instruments and radios discussed in requirement 2f. 2e.
  3. Do ONE TWO of the following:
    1. Interview a professional or military pilot. Report on what you learned.
      b. Interview a flight attendant. Report on what you learned.
      c. Interview a certified flight instructor. Report on what you learned.
      d. Under supervision, perform a preflight inspection of a light airplane.
      e. Obtain and learn how to read an aeronautical chart. Measure a true course on the chart. Correct it for magnetic variation, compass deviation, and wind drift. Arrive at a compass heading.
      f. Using one of many flight simulator software packages available for computers, "fly" the course and heading you established in requirement 3e or another course you have plotted.
      g. On a map, mark a route for an imaginary airline trip to at least three foreign countries. Start from the commercial airport nearest your home. From timetables (obtained from agents or online from a computer), decide when you will get to and leave from all connecting points.
      h.
      Build and fly a fuel-driven or battery powered electric model airplane. Describe safety rules for building and flying model airplanes Tell safety rules for use of glue, paint, dope, plastics, and fuel, and battery pack.
    2. i. Assemble a poster (or album) of original photographs taken while accomplishing the requirements.
      Build a model FPG-9. Get others in your troop or patrol to make their own model, then organize a competition to test the precision of flight and landing of the models.
  4. Do ONE of the following:
    1. Visit an airport. After the visit, report on how the facilities are used, how runways are numbered, and how runways are determined to be "active."
    2. Visit a Federal Aviation Administration facility—a control tower, terminal radar control facility, air route traffic control center, flight service station, or Flight Standards District Office. (Phone directory listings are under U.S. Government Offices, Transportation Department, Federal Aviation Administration. Call in advance.) Report on the operation and your impressions of the facility.
    3. Visit an aviation museum or attend an air show. Report on your impressions of the museum or show.
  5. Find out about three career opportunities in aviation. Pick one and find out the education, training, and experience required for this profession. Discuss this with your counselor, and explain why this profession might interest you.

Camping Merit BadgeCamping

Changes were made to requirements 3 and 9a.

The changes to the requirements read as follows:

  1. Make a written plan for an overnight trek and show how to get to your camping spot using a topographical map and compass OR a topographical map and a GPS receiver. If no GPS receiver unit is available, explain how to use one to get to your camping spot.
  2.  
    1. Camp a total of at least 20 days and 20 nights. Sleep each night under the sky or in a tent you have pitched. The 20 days and 20 nights must be at a designated Scouting activity or event. You may use a week of long-term camp toward this requirement. If the camp provides a tent that has already been pitched, you need not pitch your own tent.

Climbing Merit BadgeClimbing

Requirements 1, & 2 were renumbered as 1a & 1b and the wording changed slightly, and new requirements 2 and 7e were added.  Minor changes were made to requirements 3, 9a, 9c, & 11a

The changes to the requirements read as follows:

  1. Do the following:
    1. 1. Show that you know first aid for and how to prevent injuries or illnesses that could may occur during climbing activities, including heat and cold reactions, dehydration, stopped breathing, hypothermia, blisters, sprains, snakebite, abrasions, fractures, rope burns, blisters, snakebite, and insect bites or stings.
    2. 2. Identify the conditions that must exist before performing CPR on a person. Demonstrate proper technique in performing CPR using a training device approved by your counselor.
  2. Learn the Leave No Trace principles and Outdoor Code, and explain what they mean.
  3. Present yourself properly dressed for belaying, climbing, and rappelling (i.e., appropriate clothing, footwear, and a helmet; rappellers and belayers must also wear gloves).
  4.  
    1. Safety Knot
    1. Explain the importance of belaying every climber and rappeller climbers and rappellers and when it is necessary.
    2. Belay three different rappellers descending a rock face or climbing wall using a top rope.
    1. Using a carabiner carabiners and a rappel device, secure your climbing harness or tied harness to a rappel rope.

Cooking Merit BadgeCooking

Changes were made to requirements 2 and 8.

The changes to the requirements read as follows:

  1. Do the following:
    1. Illustrate for your counselor the food pyramid that fits you. Label the pyramid, including: following food groups in the pyramid and how much of each you should eat each day.
      1. The food groups
        1. Grains Milk, yogurt, and cheese group
        2. Vegetables Vegetable group
        3. Fruits Meats, poultry, fish, dry beans, eggs, and nuts group
        4. Milk, yogurt, cheese Fruit group
        5. Meats, poultry, fish, beans, eggs, nuts Bread, cereal, rice, and pasta group
        6. Oils (fats) and sugars
      2. The item on the pyramid that is not considered part of a food group and tell why its use is discouraged
      3. The number of servings recommended per day from each group.
    2. Explain why you should limit your intake of oils and sugars.
    3. Explain the number of servings recommended per day from each group.
    4. b. Give your counselor examples from each food group.
    5. c. Describe for your counselor the measurements of servings for each food group.
    6. d. Describe to your counselor food preparation techniques that result in more healthful and nutritious meals.
  2. Do the following:
    a.
    Find out about three career what opportunities in cooking. are available for a career in food service management. Find out what high school courses might help you prepare for a career in cooking, and about special training you might need and where to obtain such training. Discuss what you learned with your counselor. Pick one and find out the education, training, and experience required for this profession. Discuss this with your counselor, and explain why this profession might interest you.
    1. Visit a professional cook, chef, food service manager, or Registered Dietician and learn what this professional's duties are. Discuss the person's education and training, techniques, and means used in professional food preparation, and local health regulations and licensing requirements that must be followed. Report to your counselor your findings.

Dentistry Merit BadgeDentistry

Changes were made to requirement 7.

The changes to the requirements read as follows:

  1. Find out about three career opportunities in dentistry. Pick one and find out the education, training, and experience required for this profession. Discuss this with your counselor, and explain why this profession might interest you.
    Do the following:
    1. Report on careers in dentistry. Tell about the different specialties of dentistry and briefly tell what each specialist does.
    2. Choose a field in dentistry that interests you and tell your counselor why it interests you. Describe the education required and the cost of the training, and tell what specific duties would be required of someone in this field.

Entrepreneurship Merit BadgeEntrepreneurship

Changes were made to requirements 4, 5, and 6. The second sentence of item 4a1 was moved to item 4a2, the term "Goods" or "Good" was replaced with "Product" everywhere it occurs, and a sentence was added to requirement 6.

The changes to 4a1, 4a2, and 6 are as follows:

4a1. Identify your business goals. Tell how you will make the good or perform the service.

4a2.Tell how you will make the product or perform the service. Determine whether it is technically feasible (practical or doable).

6.When you believe that your business idea is feasible, start your business. Show evidence that you started your business (sales receipts, for example, or photos of the good product). Report to your counselor the results of your venture. Discuss with your counselor any ethical questions you have faced or think you may face in your business venture.


Graphic Arts Merit BadgeGraphic Arts

The requirements for this badge were revised with publication of  a new Graphic Arts merit badge pamphlet (33374B) during 2006. However, these revised requirements were omitted from Boy Scout Requirements 2007 (33215), which still shows the old requirements. Scouts should be able to use either set of requirements until BSA corrects the error.

Changes were made to requirements 1, 2, 3, 4a, 4b, & 4c. Items 7 became 6 & 7, with changes to 6b & 6d. Old Item 6 became item 7 and was rewritten.

The changes to the requirements read as follows:

  1. Review with your counselor the processes for producing printed communications: offset lithography, screen process printing, electronic/digital, relief, and gravure. You may show Collect samples of three products, each one produced using a different printing process, or draw diagrams to help with your description.
  2. Explain the differences between continuous-tone, line, and halftone artwork. Describe how it can be created and/or stored in a computer.
  3. Design a printed piece (flier, T-shirt, program, form, etc.) and produce it. Explain your decisions for the typeface or typefaces you use and the way you arrange the elements in your design. Explain which printing process is best suited for printing your design. If desktop publishing is hardware and software are available, identify what hardware and software would be appropriate for outputting your design.
    1. Offset lithographyy
      Make a layout and then produce a plate using a process approved by your counselor. Run the plate and print at least 50 copies.
    2. Screen process printing
      Make a hand-cut or photographic stencil and attach it to a screen that you have prepared. Mask the screen and print at least 20 copies.
    3. Electronic/digital printing
      Using both text and graphics, create Make a layout in electronic form, download it to the press or printer, and run 50 copies. If no electronic interface to the press or printer is available, you may print and scan a paper copy of the layout.
  4. Identify three career opportunities in graphic arts and tell how you can prepare for them.
    7.
    Do ONE of the following, and then describe the highlights of your visit:
    1. Visit a newspaper printing plant: Follow a story from the editor to the press.
    2. Visit a retail, commercial, or in-plant printing facility: Follow a project job from beginning to end.
    3. Visit a school’s graphic arts program: Find out what courses are available and what the prerequisites are.
    4. Visit three Web sites (with your parent’s permission) on the Internet that belong to graphic arts professional organizations and/or printing-related companies (suppliers, manufacturers, printers): With permission from your parent or counselor, print out or download Download product or service information from two of the sites.
  5. Find out about three career opportunities in graphic arts. Pick one and find out the education, training, and experience required for this profession. Discuss this with your counselor, and explain why this profession might interest you.

Journalism Merit BadgeJournalism

Requirements 1a, 1b, 2a1, 2b1, 3, & 4 became requirements 2a1, 2b1, 2a2, 2b2, 4, & 5 respectively, with revised wording. New items 1 & 3 were added, and old requirements 2a2 & 2b2 were deleted. 

The changes to the requirements read as follows:

  1. Explain what freedom of the press is and how the First Amendment guarantees that you can voice your opinion. In your discussion, tell how to distinguish between fact and opinion, and explain the terms libel, slander, defamation, fair comment and criticism, public figure, privacy, and malice. Discuss how these matters relate to ethics in journalism.
    Do ONE of the following:
    1. Read a local newspaper, a national newspaper, a newsmagazine, and a computerized online news source. From each of these, clip stories about the same event. Put each item on a separate piece of paper. Write an analysis comparing the different stories explaining how the stories are objective or subjective and how each publication handled the story differently depending on its purpose or audience.
    2. All on the same day, watch a local television newscast, watch a national network newscast, listen to a radio newscast, and study the computerized online news provided by a national news broadcast source. List the different news items, features, and editorials on the broadcasts, including the time in minutes and seconds devoted to each story, and print out a copy of the online edition's "front page." Write an analysis comparing the different story lists, explaining how the stories are objective or subjective and why different news outlets treated the stories differently.
  2. Do either a OR b:
    1. Print Newspaper and magazine journalism:
      1. All on the same day, read a local newspaper, a national newspaper, a newsmagazine, and (with your parent’s permission) an online news source. From each source, clip, read, and compare a story about the same event. Tell your counselor how long each story is and how fair and accurate the stories are in presenting different points of view. Tell how each source handled the story differently, depending on its purpose or audience
      2. 1. Visit a newspaper or magazine office Ask for a and tour of the various divisions, including the newsroom, the (editorial offices the business side, and the printing) plant. During your tour, talk to an editor or reporter about what it's like to be a newspaper journalist, where they get story ideas, and what makes a good newspaper. If possible, go with a reporter and your buddy to cover a news event. Get your parent's permission first. executive from the business side about management’s relations with reporters, editors, and photographers and what makes a “good” newspaper or magazine.
        2. With the help of your counselor, prepare a front-page newspaper layout. Edit copy, proofread a story after it has been typeset, and be able to explain the printing process.
    2. Broadcast Radio and television journalism:
      1. All on the same day, watch a local and national network newscast, listen to a radio newscast, and (with your parent’s permission) view a national broadcast news source online. List the different news items and features presented, the different elements used, and the time in minutes and seconds and the online space devoted to each story Compare the story lists, and discuss whether the stories are fair and accurate. Explain why different news outlets treated the stories differently and/or presented a different point of view.
      2. 1. Visit a radio or television station. Ask for a and tour of the various departments, concentrating on those related to news broadcasts divisions, including the newsroom, the studios, the control rooms, and the business side. During your tour, talk to the station manager or other station management executive about station operations, particularly how management and the news staff work together a producer or reporter about what it's like to be a broadcast journalist, where they get story ideas, and what makes a good station. If possible, go with a reporter and your buddy to cover a news event. Get your parent's permission first.
        2. With the help of your counselor prepare a television or radio news show format. Edit audiotape or videotape, and be able to explain what it takes to broadcast radio or television news.
      3. Discuss the differences between a hard news story and a feature story. Explain what is the “five W’s and H.” Then do ONE of the following:
        1. Choose a current or an unusual event of interest to you, and write either a hard news article OR a feature article about the event. Gear the article for print OR audio OR video journalism. Share your article with your counselor.
        2. With your parent’s permission and counselor’s approval, interview someone in your community who is influential because of his or her leadership, talent, career, or life experiences. Then present to y                                                 our counselor either a written or oral report telling what you learned about this person.
        3. With your parent’s permission and counselor’s approval, read an autobiography written by a journalist you want to learn more about. Write an article that tells what you learned about this person and the contributions this person has made to the field of journalism.
        4. Attend a Scouting event and write a 200-word article (feature or hard news) about the event. Use either the inverted pyramid style or the chronological style. Review the article with your counselor, then submit it to your community newspaper or BSA local council or district newsletter for consideration.
      4. 3. Attend a public news event and do ONE of the following:
        1. Write two a newspaper articles story about the event, one using the inverted pyramid style and one using the chronological style a sidebar feature, and either an editorial or a critical review of the event.
        2. Using a radio or TV television broadcasting style write a news story about the event, a feature color story and either an editorial or a critical review of the event.
        3. Take a series of photographs that would help to help tell the story of the event in pictures., including some Include news photos and some feature photos in your presentation. Write cutlines for your photos and a brief story synopsis of the event as well as captions for your photos.
      5. 4. Answer at least three of five questions about qualifications, educational preparations, training opportunities, wages, and personal satisfaction in journalism.
        Find out about three career opportunities in journalism. Pick one and find out the education, training, and experience required for this profession. Discuss this with your counselor, and explain why this profession might interest you.

Personal Fitness Merit BadgePersonal Fitness

The introductory note and requirements 1, 2e, 3d, 3f, 3i, 4c, 6 (including the the Flexibility, Muscular strength, and Body Composition Tests), 8, & 9 were revised.

Note that the wording in the Personal Fitness merit badge pamphlet (33286B) and in Boy Scout Requirements 2007 (33215) varies slightly in a number of locations, but those variations are insignificant. The wording shown below is from the pamphlet.

The changes to the requirements read as follows:

NOTE: If meeting any of the requirements for this merit badge is against the Scout's religious convictions, the requirement it does not have to be done if the Scout's boy's parents and the proper religious advisers church officials state in writing that: to do so would be against religious convictions. The Scout's parents must also accept full responsibility for anything that might happen because of this exemption.

  1. To do so would be against religious convictions.
  2. The parents accept full responsibility for anything that might happen because of such exemption. They release the Boy Scouts of America from any responsibility.
  1. Do the following:
    1. Before you try to meet any other completing requirements 2 through 9, have your  health-care practitioner provider give you a physical examination, using the Scout medical examination form. Describe the examination. Tell what questions the doctor  you were asked about your health. Tell what health or medical recommendations the doctor were made and report what you have done in response to the recommendations.  Explain the following:
      1. Why physical exams are important
      2. Why preventative preventive habits are important in maintaining good health.
      3. Diseases that can be prevented and how.
      4. The seven warning signs of cancer.
      5. The youth risk factors that affect cardiovascular fitness in adulthood.
    2. Have a dental an examination made by your dentist. Get a statement saying that your teeth have been checked and cared for. Tell how to care for your teeth.
    1. What it means to be socially healthy. Discuss your activity in the eight areas of healthy social fitness.
    1. Is Are your body weight and composition what you would like them to be, and do you know how to modify them safely through exercise, diet, and behavior modification?
    2. Are you free from habits relating to poor nutrition and the use of alcohol, tobacco, drugs, and other practices that could be harmful to your health?
    3. Are you actively involved in the religious organization of your choice, and do you participate in its their youth activities?
    1. The need to have a balance in all four components of personal physical fitness.
  2. Before doing requirements 7 and 8, complete the aerobic fitness, flexibility, muscular strength, and body composition tests as described in the Personal Fitness merit badge pamphlet. Record your results and identify those areas where you feel you need to improve.

Aerobic Fitness Test

Record your performance on one of the following tests:

  1. Run/walk as far as you can in nine minutes 
    OR
  2. Run/walk one mile as fast as you can

Flexibility Test

Using a sit-and-reach box constructed according to specifications in this merit badge pamphlet, make four repetitions and record the fourth reach. This last reach must be held for 15 seconds to qualify. (Remember to keep your knees down.)

Click here to see how to build a Sit and Reach Box.

Muscular Strength Tests

You must use the sit-up test and EITHER the pull-up or push-up test. Record your performance on all three tests.

  • Sit-ups. Record the number of sit-ups done correctly in 60 seconds. The sit-ups must be done in the form explained and illustrated in this the merit badge pamphlet.

Click here to see the illustration from the merit badge pamphlet

  • Pull-ups. Record the total number of pull-ups completed correctly in 60 seconds. Be consistent with the procedures presented in this the merit badge pamphlet.

Click here to see the illustration from the merit badge pamphlet

  • Push-ups. Record the total number of push-ups completed correctly in 60 seconds. Be consistent with the procedures presented in this the merit badge pamphlet.

Click here to see the illustration from the merit badge pamphlet

Body Composition Test

Have your parent, counselor, or other adult take and record the following measurements:

  • Circumference of the right upper arm, midway between the shoulder and the elbow, with the arm hanging naturally and not flexed.
  • Shoulders, with arms hanging by placing the tape two inches below the top of the shoulders shoulder and around the arms, chest, and back during after breath expiration.
  • Chest, by placing the tape under the arms and around the chest and back at the nipple line during after breath expiration.
  • Abdomen circumference at the navel level (relaxed).
  • Circumference of the right Right thigh, midway between the hip and knee, and not flexed.

If possible, have the same person take the measurements whenever you are ready to be remeasured to chart your progress. they are recorded.

  1. Complete the physical fitness program you outlined in requirement 7. Keep a log of your fitness program activity (how long you exercised; how far you ran, swam, or biked; how many exercise repetitions you completed; your exercise heart rate; etc.). Repeat the aerobic fitness, muscular strength, and flexibility tests every two weeks and record your results. After the 12th week, repeat all four tests, record your results, and show improvement in each one. Compare and analyze your preprogram and postprogram body composition measurements. Discuss the meaning and benefit of your experience, and describe your long-term plans regarding your personal fitness.
  2. Describe your long-term plans regarding your personal fitness. Find out about three career opportunities in personal fitness. Pick one and find out the education, training, and experience required for this professions. Discuss what you learned with your counselor, and explain why this profession might interest you.

Rowing Merit BadgeRowing

Requirements 1, 3, 5, 7, 10b, 10c, 11b, & 11d were revised.

Item 1 in Boy Scout Requirements 2007 (33214) does not match the version in the Rowing Merit Badge pamphlet (33404B), as shown below.  In the requirements book, the phrase "and how to prevent" was omitted.

The changes to the requirements read as follows:
  1. Show that you know first aid for and how to prevent injuries or illnesses that could occur while rowing, including cold and heat reactions, hypothermia, heatstroke, heat exhaustion, dehydration, sunburn, contusions, lacerations, and blisters.
  2. Before doing the following requirements, successfully complete the BSA swimmer test. Jump feetfirst into water over your head in depth. Level off and swim 75 yards in a strong manner using one or more of the following strokes: sidestroke, breaststroke, trudgen, or crawl; then swim 25 yards using an easy, resting backstroke. The 100 yards must be swum continuously completed in one swim without stops and must include at least one sharp turn. After completing the swim, rest by floating.
  3. Do ONE of the following: Alone or with a passenger, do the following correctly in either a fixed-seat or sliding-seat rowboat:
    1. Launch and land from and to shore.
      Alone or with a passenger, do the following correctly in either a fixed-seat or sliding-seat rowboat:
      1. Launch
      2. Row in a straight line for a quarter mile. Stop, make a pivot turn, and return to the starting point.
      3. Backwater in a straight line for 50 yards. Make a turn under way and return to the starting point.
      4. Land and moor or rack your craft.
      5. Tie the following mooring knots: - clove hitch, roundturn with two half-hitches, bowline, Wellman's knot, and mooring hitch.
    2. Row in a straight line for a quarter mile. Stop, make a pivot turn, and return to the starting point.
      Participate as a rowing team member in a competitive rowing meet. The team may be sponsored by a school, club, or Scout unit. The meet must include competition between two or more teams with different sponsors. Complete at least 10 hours of team practice prior to the meet.
      c. Backwater in a straight line for 50 yards. Make a turn under way and return to the starting point.
      d. Properly moor or rack your craft. Demonstrate your ability to tie the following mooring knots: clove hitch, roundturn with two half hitches, bowline, and hitching tie or mooring hitch.
  4. Participate in a swamped boat drill, including righting and stabilizing the craft, reboarding in deep water, and making headway. Alone, or with one other person who is a swimmer, tip over a rowboat.* Turn it right side up, get in, and row or paddle 10 yards with hands or oars. Tell why you should stay with a swamped boat.
  5. Describe the following:
    1. Four common boat building materials. Give some positive good and negative bad points of each.
    2. Types of oarlocks used in commercial, competitive, and recreational rowing.
  6. Discuss the following:
    1. Precautions regarding strong winds and heavy waves, and boat-handling procedures in rough water and windstorms.
      How to handle a rowboat in a storm
    2. How to calculate the weight a boat can may carry under normal conditions

* This requirement can be met in shallow water.


Safety Merit BadgeSafety

Each of the requirements has been revised, and a new requirement 7 was added.

The change in item 2a, and the word "burglary," in item 3b, do not appear in Boy Scout Requirements 2007 (33214), but are in the Safety Merit Badge pamphlet (33347B), as shown below.

The changes to the requirements read as follows:

  1. Prepare a safety notebook to include:
    1. Newspaper and other stories, facts, and statistics showing common types kinds and causes of accidents injuries in the home and in the workplace, and how these injuries could be prevented.
    2. Newspaper and other stories, facts, and statistics showing common types kinds of crimes against families like yours and ways to avoid being a crime victim..
    3. Facts you have obtained concerning the frequency of accidents and of crimes involving families in your locality in your local area.
    4. A paragraph or more, written by you, explaining how your family life could be changed by a serious fire, accident, or crime could change your family life.
    5. A list of safe practices and safety devices currently used in your home and automobile by your family, such as safety practices used while driving or working and safety devices that prevent injuries or help in an emergency.
  2. Do the following:
    1. Using a safety checklist approved by your counselor, make an inspection of your home. Explain the hazards found and how they these can be corrected.
    2. Review or develop your family's plan of escape in case of fire in your family's home.
  3. Do the following:
    1. Discuss with your counselor how you contribute to the safety of yourself, your family, and your community.
    2. Show your family members how to protect themselves and your home from accidents, fire, theft burglary, robbery, and assault.
    3. Discuss with your counselor the tips for online safety.  Explain the steps individuals can take to help prevent identity theft.
    4. Discuss with your counselor the three R's of Youth Protection and how to recognize child abuse.
  4. Show your family the exits you would use from different public buildings (such as a church, theater, municipal building, library, supermarket, shopping center, or your place of worship) in the event of an emergency. Teach your family what to do in the event of a panic that they need to take shelter in or evacuate a public place.
  5. Make a plan for an accident prevention programs plan for five family activities outside the home (at your place of worship church, at a theater, on a picnic, at the a beach, and while traveling, for example). Each plan should include an analysis of possible hazards, proposed action to correct hazards, and reasons for the corrections correction you propose in each plan.
  6. Plan and complete a safety project approved by your counselor for in your home, school, place of worship church, place of employment, or community. Include in your plan an explanation of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security's Advisory System and appropriate actions to take for each threat level.
  7. Learn about three career opportunities in the field of safety. Pick one career and find out the education, training, and experience required for this profession. Discuss this choice with your counselor, and explain why this profession might interest you.

Shotgun Shooting Merit BadgeShotgun Shooting

Changes were made to requirements 1c, 2 - Option A - b & f, and 2 - Option B - j

The changes to the requirements read as follows:

    1. Explain the need, for and use, and types of eye and ear hearing protection.
  1. OPTION A --- SHOTGUN SHOOTING (MODERN SHOTSHELL TYPE)

    1. Identify and demonstrate the rules for safely handling a gun shotgun.
    2. Identify and demonstrate the five fundamentals of safely shooting a shotgun.

    OPTION B --- MUZZLE-LOADING SHOTGUN SHOOTING

    1. Identify the materials needed to clean a muzzle-loading shotgun properly and safely.

There are some additional items, shown below, in the requirements list in the Shotgun Shooting Merit Badge Pamphlet (33331A), which are not in Boy Scout Requirements 2007 (33215). The added text is shown in this format.

OPTION A --- SHOTGUN SHOOTING (MODERN SHOTSHELL TYPE)

  1. Identify the various gauges of shotguns. Explain which one you would pick for use and why.
    Explain what a misfire, hangfire, and squib fire are, and explain the procedures to follow in response to each.

Shooting skill rules:

  • If using a trap field, shoot station 3 with traps set to throw straightaway targets.
  • If using a skeet field, shoot station 7 low house.

OPTION B --- MUZZLE-LOADING SHOTGUN SHOOTING

  1. Shooting score required. -- Hit at least 5 out of 15 targets in two 15-target groups. The two groups need not be shot in consecutive order.

Shooting skill rules:

  • On a standard trap field, the shooter should be positioned 8 yards behind the trap house. The trap should be set to throw only straightaway targets
  • If using a skeet field, shoot station 7 low house.

Snow Sports Merit BadgeSnow Sports

Changes were made to requirements 1, 2, 3, and 4. In requirement 5, changes were made to requirements c, d, f, & l(2) under Downhill (Alpine) skiing, requirements a, b, & g under Cross-country (Nordic) skiing, and requirements b & d-i under Snowboarding.

The changes to the requirements read as follows:

  1. Discuss winter sports safety, and show that you know first aid for injuries or illnesses that could occur while skiing or riding, including hypothermia, frostbite, shock, dehydration, sunburn, fractures, bruises, sprains, and strains. Tell how to apply splints.
  2. Explain why every skier or snowboarder should be prepared to render first aid in the event of a skiing an accident.
  3. Explain the procedure used to report an accident to the local ski patrol for the area where you usually ski or ride.
  4. Tell the meaning of the Your Responsibility Code for skiers and snowboarders. Explain why you must follow this code.
    Do EACH of the following:
    1. Tell the meaning of the Your Responsibility Code for skiers and snow-boarders. Explain why each rider must follow this code.
    2. Explain the Smart Style safety program. Tell why it is important and how it applies to skiers and snowboarders in terrain parks and pipes.
    3. Explain the precautions pertaining to avalanche safety, including the responsibility of individuals regarding avalanche safety.
    4. Tell the meaning of the Wilderness Use Policy. Explain why each skier and snowboarder must adopt this policy.

Downhill (Alpine) Skiing

  1. Explain and discuss the following:
    1. Five types of Alpine skis
    2. Telemark skis
    3. Snowboards
      d.
      Name the major ski organizations in the United States and explain their functions.
  2. Discuss the five types of Alpine skis. Demonstrate two ways to carry skis and poles safely and easily.
  3. Do the following:
    1.
    Present yourself properly clothed and equipped for downhill skiing. Discuss how the clothing you have chosen will keep you warm and protected.
    2. Demonstrate two ways to carry skis and poles safely and easily.
    1. Sideslip A sideslip and safety (hockey) stop to each side

Cross-Country (Nordic) Skiing

  1. Tell the meaning of the Wilderness Use Policy. Explain why each skier must adopt this policy.
    b.
    Show your ability to select, use, and repair, if necessary, the correct equipment for ski touring in safety and comfort.
  2. Discuss classical and telemark skis. Demonstrate two ways to carry skis safely and easily.
  3. Present yourself properly clothed and equipped for a one-day ski tour. Discuss the correct use of your clothing and equipment, and how the clothing you have chosen will keep you warm and protected.

Snowboarding

  1. Do the following:
    1. Demonstrate your ability to select the correct equipment for snowboarding and to use it for safety and comfort.
    2. Present yourself properly clothed and equipped for snowboarding. Discuss how the clothing you have chosen will keep you warm and protected.
    3. Demonstrate how to carry a snowboard easily and safely.
  2. Discuss the four types of snowboards. Demonstrate how to carry a snowboard easily and safely.
  3. d. Demonstrate exercises and activities that will get you fit for snowboarding.
  4. e. Demonstrate how to ride one kind of lift and explain how to ride two others.
  5. f. Explain the international trail-marking system.
  6. g. Demonstrate the basic principles of waxing a snowboard.
  7. Do the following:
    1. h. On a gentle slope, demonstrate beginning snowboarding maneuvers. Show basic ways to control speed and direction. Include the sideslipping maneuver.
    2. i. On slightly steeper terrain, show traversing.

Sports Merit BadgeSports

The requirements were substantially rewritten..

The requirements now read as follows:

Note: The activities used to fulfill the requirements for the Sports merit badge may not be used to help fulfill requirements for other merit badges.

  1. Show that you know first aid for and how to prevent injuries or illnesses that could occur while playing sports, including sprains, strains, contusions, abrasions, fractures, blisters, muscle cramps, dehydration, heat and cold reactions. injured teeth, nausea, and suspected injuries to the head, neck, and back.
  2. Explain the importance of the following:
    1. The physical exam
    2. Maintaining good health habits, especially during training
    3. Maintaining a healthy diet
  3. Discuss the following:
    1. The importance of warming up and cooling down
    2. The importance of weight training
    3. What an amateur athlete is and the differences between an amateur and a professional athlete
    4. The attributes (qualities) of a good sport, the importance of sportsmanship, and the traits of a good team leader and player who exhibits Scout spirit on and off the playing field
  4. Take part for one season (or four months) as a competitive individual or as a member of an organized team in TWO of the following sports: baseball, basketball, bowling, cross-country, field hockey, football, ice hockey, lacrosse, soccer, softball, table tennis, tennis, volleyball, water polo. Your counselor may approve in advance other recognized sports, but not any sport that is restricted and not authorized by the Boy Scouts of America. Then with your chosen sports do the following:
    1. Give the rules and etiquette for the two sports you picked.
    2. List the equipment needed for the two sports you chose. Describe the protective equipment and appropriate clothing (if any) and explain why it is needed.
    3. Draw diagrams of the playing areas for your two sports.
  5. With guidance from your counselor, establish a personal training program suited to the activities you chose for requirement 4. Then do the following:
    1. Organize a chart to track your training, practice, and development in these sports for one season (or four months).
    2. Demonstrate proper technique for your two chosen sports.
    3. At the end of the season, share your completed chart with your counselor and discuss how your participation in the sports you chose has affected you mentally and physically.

Stamp Collecting Merit BadgeStamp Collecting

Changes were made to requirements 1b, 2, 5d, 5f, 7b, 7c, 7f, 8d, and 8e.

The changes to the requirements read as follows:

    1. Briefly describe some aspects of the history, growth, and development of the United States postal system. Tell how it How is it different from postal systems in other countries?.
  1. Define topical stamp collecting. What are some Name and describe three other types of stamp collections?.
    1. Hinges and stamp mounts
    2. Envelopes Glassine envelopes and cover sleeves
    1. Visit a post office, stamp club, or stamp show with an experienced collector. Explain what you saw and/or did and learned.
    2. Write a review of an interesting article from a stamp newspaper, magazine, or book or Web site (with your parent's permission).
    3. Prepare a two- to three-page display involving stamps. Using ingenuity, as well as clippings, drawings, etc., tell a story about the stamps, and how . How do they relate to history, geography, or a favorite topic of yours?.
    1. A collection of 75 or more different stamps on a single topic. (Some interesting topics are Scouting, birds, insects, the Olympics, sports, flowers, animals, ships, Christmas, holidays, trains, famous people, space, and medicine). Stamps may be from different countries.
    2. A collection of postal items discovered in your mail by monitoring it over a period of 30 days. Include at least five different types listed in requirement 3, above.

Traffic Safety Merit BadgeTraffic Safety

Requirements 1a, b, c, & d, 2a, 3 (introduction), and 4c were revised. Requirement 5d was deleted, a new requirement 5b was added and old requirements 5b & c were revised and renumbered as 5c & d. A minor editorial change was made to 3c.

The changes to the requirements read as follows:

  1. Do the following:
    1. Make a scrapbook containing 10 newspaper articles about serious traffic crashes. Prepare a summary table of facts in the articles indicating the number of people injured, the number killed, type of crash (single vehicle, head-on collision, etc.), time of occurrence, age of the driver, whether alcohol or drugs were involved, use of safety belts, and any other factors that were reported to have contributed to the crash (weather conditions, fatigue, construction, etc.). Discuss how these crashes could have been prevented.
      Describe the top 10 mistakes new drivers frequently make. Name the two items you are required by law to carry with you whenever you operate a motor vehicle.
    2. Describe how alcohol and other drugs affect affects the human body and why this is a problem for safely driving a motor vehicle a person should never drink and drive, or drive while under the influence of any mind-altering substances, including prescription drugs, cold medications, and illicit drugs. For the state where you live, find out what is Research the legal blood alcohol concentration in your state and the consequences for driving while intoxicated or driving under the influence. Find out what the open-container law is in your state.
    3. Describe at least four factors to be considered when an engineer designs in the design of a road or highway. Explain how roadside hazards and road conditions contribute to the occurrence and seriousness of traffic crashes.
    4. Explain why a driver who is fatigued or distracted should not operate a motor vehicle. List five common distractions, explain how driver distractions contribute to traffic accidents, and tell how drivers can minimize distractions. Describe how volunteer drivers can plan to be alert when transporting Scouting participants.
  2. Do the following:
    1. Identify the different types of occupant restraint systems used in motor vehicles. Describe how they work and their purpose for safety. Demonstrate how to properly wear a lap or and shoulder belt belts. Explain why it is important for drivers and passengers to wear safety belts at all times.
    2. List five safety features found in motor vehicles besides occupant restraint systems. Describe each safety feature, how each works, and how each contributes to safety.
  3. Do the following to show your knowledge of car care for safety maintenance:
    1. Demonstrate a method to check for adequate tire tread. Explain why proper tire tread is important to safe driving.
  4. Do the following:
    1. Make a chart of standard traffic signs. Explain how color and shape are used to help road users recognize and understand the information presented. Explain how color and shape are used to help road users recognize and understand the information presented on traffic and roadway signs. Explain the purpose of different types of signs, signals, and pavement markings.
  5. Do ONE of the following:
    1. Using the Internet (with your parent's permission), visit five Web sites that cover safe driving for teenagers. As a group, discuss what you learn with your counselor and at least three other teenagers.
    2. b. Initiate and organize an activity or event to demonstrate the importance of traffic safety. Activities could include making a traffic safety presentation before a school assembly, to classes of younger students, or to another large group of people; having a staged demonstration of the consequences of a crash, working with the police and paramedics; organizing a presentation to the students of your school by an emergency room doctor and/or nurse to describe their experiences with motor vehicle crash victims; organizing a clinic to demonstrate safe bicycle riding and helmet use.
    3. c. Accompanied by an adult and a buddy, pick a safe place to observe traffic at a controlled intersection (traffic signal or stop sign) on three separate days and at three different times of the day, for 30 minutes on each visit. At this intersection, and survey (1) such violations as running a red light or stop sign; or (2) seat belt usage. Count the number of violations or number of drivers not wearing a seat belt. Record in general terms if the driver was young or old young/old, male or female male/ female. Keep track of the total number of vehicles observed so that you can determine the percentage of compliance vs. violations. Discuss the findings with your merit badge counselor.
      d. Based on what you have learned so far, develop a checklist for a safe trip. Share the checklist with your merit badge counselor, and use the checklist whenever your family makes a vehicle trip. Include on the list the responsibilities of the driver and the passengers for before and during the trip.

Weather Merit BadgeWeather

Changes were made to requirements 1, 3, 4, 7, 8, and 9, and requirement 10 was added.

The changes to the requirements read as follows:

  1. Define meteorology. Explain what weather is and what climate is. Discuss how the weather affects farmers, sailors, aviators, and the outdoors outdoor construction industry. Tell why weather forecasts are important to each of these groups.
  2. Explain the difference between high and low pressure systems in the atmosphere. Tell which is related to good and to poor weather. Draw cross sections of a cold front and a warm front, showing the location and movements of the cold and warm air, the frontal slope, the location and types of clouds associated with the each type of front, and the location of rain precipitation. Tell the differences between a cold front and a warm front.
  3. Tell what causes wind, why it rains, and how lightning and hail are formed. Explain the difference between high and low pressure systems in the atmosphere and tell which is related to good and poor weather.
  4. Define acid rain. Identify which human activities pollute the atmosphere as well as and the effects such pollution can have on people.
  5. Do ONE of the following:
    1. Make one of the following instruments: wind vane, anemometer, rain gauge, hygrometer. Keep a daily weather log for one week using information from this instrument as well as from other sources such as local radio and television stations or NOAA Weather Radio. The , and Internet sources (with your parent's permission). Record the following information should be recorded at the same time every day: wind direction and speed, temperature, precipitation, and types of clouds. Be sure to make a note of any morning dew or frost. In the log, also list the weather forecasts from radio or television at the same time each day and show how the weather really turned out.
    2. Visit a National Weather Service office or talk with a local radio or television weathercaster, private meteorologist, local agricultural Extension extension service office officer, or university meteorology instructor. Find out what type of weather is most dangerous or damaging to your community. Determine how severe weather and flood warnings reach the homes in your community.
  6. Do ONE of the following:
    1. Give a talk of more than at least five minutes to a group (such as your unit or a Cub Scout pack) explaining the camping outdoor safety rules in the event of lightning, flash floods, and tornadoes. Before your talk, show share your outline to with your counselor for approval.
    2. Read several articles about acid rain and give a prepared talk of more than at least five minutes about the articles to a group (such as your unit or a Cub Scout pack). Before your talk, show share your outline to with your counselor for approval.
  7. Find out about a weather-related career opportunity that interests you. Discuss with and explain to your counselor what training and education are required for such a position, and the responsibilities required of such a position.

This analysis was prepared as a service to Scouts and Scouters nationwide
Paul S. Wolf
Advancement Webmaster
US Scouting Service Project, Inc.

Printed copies of this document may be freely distributed for use in the Scouting program, so long as the source is acknowledged, but copying the information to another web site is NOT authorized.

 

Page updated on: November 16, 2012



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