The Scoutmaster's Minutes -- Part 4

More Scoutmaster's Minutes

Table of Contents

121. Aim So High You'll Never Be Bored
122. The Snake That Poisons
123. The Real Way To Happiness
124. Thanksgiving
125. Scouting Pathfinder - Baden-Powell
126. Scouting Pathfinder - Ernest Thompson Seton
127. Scouting Pathfinder - Daniel Carter Beard
128. Measuring Yourself By The Golden Rule
129. Don't Be A Litterbug
130. Be Prepared For Any Old Thing
131. Two Hundred Years Of Freedom
132. Can Eight Words Make A Difference
133. The Winning Spirit
134. Patrol Spirit
135. Laws And Men
136. Measuring Up
137. Hibernation
138. Your Wild Animal
139. Your Cook Kit
140. Junk Food
141. A Scout Is Obedient
142. Scouts In Action
143. A Scout Is Friendly
144. World Friendship
145. Even A Parrot
146. Our Oath And Law
147. Strengthening Our Troop
148. World Friendship
149. The Scout Trail
150. It All Depends
151. Many Good Turns
152. Thanks To BSA
153. The Scout Handshake
154. Recipe For Life
155. Parents
156. Outdoor Housekeeping
157. Jamboree Spirit
158. The Buddy Plan
159. Camping In The Twenties
160. A Scout Is Brave
161. Communication
162. A Winner
163. Carrying Scouting's Flame

121. AIM SO HIGH YOU'LL NEVER BE BORED

The greatest waste of our natural resources is the number of people who never achieve their potential. Get out of that slow lane. Shift into that fast lane. If you think you can't, you won't. If you think you can, there's a good chance you will. Even making the effort will make you feel like a new person. Reputations are made by searching for the things that can't be done and doing them. Aim low boring. Aim high soaring.

122. THE SNAKE THAT POISONS EVERYBODY

It topples governments, wrecks marriages, ruins careers, busts reputations, causes heartaches, nightmares, indigestion, spawns suspicion, generates grief, dispatches innocent people to cry in their pillows. Even its name hisses. It's called gossip. Office gossip, shop gossip, party gossip. It makes headlines and headaches. Before you repeat a story, ask yourself: Is it true? Is it fair? is it necessary? If not, shut up.

123. THE REAL WAY TO HAPPINESS

Who can tell me what the Scout slogan is? That's right, "Do a Good Turn daily". The handbook tells us that a Good Turn is an extra act of kindness. It might be a big thing like saving somebody's life with courage and skill. Or could be some small act like picking up trash on the street or helping a child get his kite out of a tree.

There are two good reasons for doing Good Turns. One of them, obviously, is that it makes other people happy. But you will find, if you do a Good Turn daily, that it makes you feel good, too. Baden Powell, the man who started Scouting in England almost 80 years ago, said this about a Good Turn: "The real way to get happiness is by giving it to other people. " Everyone of us should be doing our Good Turn daily. Are you? If you don't think about it very often, it's a good idea to start now. We'' be reminding ourselves later this month when we do a troop Good Turn for ___________. But if you have the Scouting Spirit, you will do your best to follow the Scout slogan in your daily life with some small service to your family, your teacher, your friends, or a perfect stranger.

124. THANKSGIVING

Thanksgiving is almost here, and that means a school holiday, probably some football games to watch, and surely a big meal of turkey with all the trimmings.

It's a great time for everybody. But before the holiday passes, take a few minutes to think about what it really means. Thanksgiving started out to be a time for giving thanks to God for his blessings. We should make sure to keep that thought in our celebration today.

That doesn't mean we have to spend the whole holiday time in prayer. By all means we should enjoy the feast and the football. But we should also remember that a Scout is reverent, and part of that point of the Scout Law is praying and giving thanks at appropriate times. So when you sit down to your big Thanksgiving dinner, don't forget to offer your thanks to God, not only for the food but for all your other blessings.

125. SCOUTING PATHFINDER - BADEN-POWELL

Three months from now, we're going to be celebrating the ___th anniversary of the Boy Scouts of America. But Scouting is even older than that. It really began ____ years ago on a little island in England. British general named Robert Baden-Powell took 21 boys camping on this island and tested his ideas of Scouting for boys.

From that first camp, the idea grew into a worldwide movement. Baden-Powell was a remarkable man. You can read a little about him on page 475 of your handbook. Baden-Powell wrote the first Scout Oath and Law and motto, "Be Prepared. " He developed the idea for patrols within a troop, and he taught many of the outdoor skills we learn today. Now let us honor Baden-Powell by repeating the Scout Oath. (Lead Oath)

126. SCOUTING PATHFINDER - ERNEST THOMPSON SETON

Last week I talked about Baden-Powell, the English general who founded Boy Scouting. While Baden-Powell was working out his ideas for Scouting, in this country a man named Ernest Thompson Seton was doing something quite similar. Seton was an author and an artist, and even before Baden-Powell organized the first Scouts, Seton had started a boy's organization called the Woodcraft Indians.

His Woodcraft Indians hiked and camped and studied nature, just as Scouts do. When Baden-Powell's Boy Scouting idea spread to America, Seton joined in . He became the first Chief Scout of the Boy Scouts of America, and he did much to spread the idea of Scouting here.

Seton stressed Indian lore, and many of his ideas still live in the Order of the Arrow. In honor of Ernest Thompson Seton let us repeat the Scout Law. (Lead Law)

127. SCOUTING PATHFINDER - DANIEL CARTER BEARD

I told you last week about Ernest Thompson Seton, who was one of the earliest leaders of the Boy Scouts of America. Another important leader of the BSA in those days was Daniel Carter Beard. He was an illustrator and writer of boys' book. In 1902, ____ years ago he started an organization for boys called the Sons of Daniel Boone.

In was a pretty informal organization. Mostly he promoted it by writing magazine articles and letters to boys. But the Sons of Daniel Boone were forerunners of Boy Scouts, and Beard became one of the main leaders of Scouting Let's honor Dan Beard with our patrol calls. (Each patrol gives call)

128. MEASURE YOURSELF BY THE GOLDEN RULE

(Show an ordinary ruler)

What do I have here? Right, it's a ruler. Some people call it a rule. This one isn't golden but it does remind me of the Golden Rule. Do you know what the Golden Rule is?

"Do unto others as you would have them do unto you. " That's a great guide for living, Scouts. If we always followed that rule, we would always be kind to others because no-one wants unkindness done to him.

The trouble is, we aren't saints. And so we don't always follow the Scout Law - A Scout is kind" - or the Golden Rule. Some of us follow the Golden Rule for about three inches. Others makes it eight inches. A few of us might make it all the way to eleven inches.

How far do you go on the Golden Rule? Probably not as far as you could. So the next time you're tempted to do something unkind, or say something that will hurt someone, stop and think. What will it do to your place on the Golden Rule?

129. DON'T BE A LITTERBUG

(Hold up a paper carton or other piece of litter)

This month we've been talking a lot about conservation of natural resources, and next week on our campout we're going to tackle some conservation work in the woods.

But one thing we all do everyday to help is to avoid throwing litter around. (Toss litter in waste basket. ) I'm not saying that if we avoid littering, a tree will grow better or a wild creature will benefit. But we will, because a clean environment looks a lot better, and it will encourage us to do some real conservation work.

An awful lot of people are litterbugs. They think nothing of tossing cans, bottles, cartons and other junk on to the ground wherever they go. It's a disgusting habit, and one I hope none of you does or will ever start.

As Scouts, we should live by the Outdoor Code and be clean in our outdoor manners. That means we never throw litter on the trail and we always leave our campsites better than we found them. Let's try to remember that all the time, not only when we're outdoors with the troop.

130. BE PREPARED FOR ANY OLD THING

What's the Scout motto? That's right, "Be Prepared. " Can anyone tell me where it came from? Well, it was started by a man who founded the Scouting movement almost 80 years ago. His name was Robert Baden-Powell. He was an English general who took the first Scouts camping back in 1907. He was a most interesting man. If you're curious about him, you can learn a little by reading page 475 of your handbook.

Baden-Powell was once asked what the motto meant. What is a Scout supposed to be prepared for?

"Why any old thing," Baden-Powell replied.

That's a tall order. Life holds a lot of surprises and we can't be prepared for all of them. But in Scouting you're learning how to handle many surprises and crises. You learn how to give first aid, how to live comfortably outdoors, give service to your community and nation, clean up your environment, do good Turns for people and a host of other things. Later this month we're going to talk about being prepared to make choices between right and wrong, too.

Preparing you for life is what Scouting is all about. We're going to do our best to make you prepared for any old thing.

131. TWO HUNDRED YEARS OF FREEDOM

Can anybody tell me what holiday falls on September 17. It's Citizenship Day or Constitution Day. Probably you've been talking about the reason for that holiday in school. If you don't already know it, on September 17, 200 years ago, the founders of this country agreed upon the US Constitution.

It is by far the oldest written constitution of any country in the world, and it is the main reason that we enjoy freedom today. The Constitution established our form of government, and perhaps more important, it guarantees the rights of citizenship that we all enjoy.

Most of us take those rights for granted. We can't imagine living in a country where people cannot speak freely, worship God as they wish, or join associations that criticize the government and blast the President. But there are billions of people in the world without any of those rights.

Remember that as you grow older and begin to vote, pay taxes, and perhaps become a leader in government or civic affairs. The Constitution is the foundation stone of this country, which is why the President and many other officials take an oath "to protect and defend the Constitution. " Each of us should take the same oath because it is the basis of our liberty.

132. CAN EIGHT WORDS MAKE A DIFFERENCE

Doctrines, credos, manifestos, laws, declarations, codes of ethics. Ever since people have been able to communicate they have compiled words to live by. But the world is still troubled. Take these words: Honesty, Workmanship, Ambition, Faith, Education, Charity, Responsibility, Courage. Chances are that four and half billion people won't agree to live their lives by them. But think how much better your life would be if just one person does. You.

133. THE WINNING SPIRIT

Scouts, what is a winning spirit? In some sports, people say that a guy who has the winning spirit really comes to play. That kind of guy is sometimes called a "gamer".

In Scouting we have gamers, too. Know who they are? They're the guys who are active in their patrols and in our troop. They're always trying to learn something new and to advance from one rank to another.

That kind of guy has his own motto. His motto is, "Be First Class". From the day he joins the troop he's shooting for First Class - in rank and in everything he does. You new Scouts should remember that. Be First Class!

134. PATROL SPIRIT

I'm sure all of you Scouts have played team sports, so you know what teamwork means. Most football fans see a touchdown run and say, "Wow! Isn't that guy a great runner?" Maybe he is, but if you have played football you that what really made the great run was the blockers on the line and in the secondary. Teamwork made the touchdown. Not just one guy's talents.

Patrols are the same way. If you win one of our interpatrol contests, or if you have the best campsite at a camporee, it's not just because one guy is such a great Scout. It's patrol teamwork.

The secret of patrol teamwork is have every member do his job, whatever it is. If one Scout goofs off, the patrol suffers. If every Scout does his part, the patrol is bound to be a winner.

The winning attitude is what we call patrol spirit. Is your patrol a winner? I'm not asking whether you win every contest. I'm asking: Is your patrol doing the very best that it can and is every member contributing? If your answer is no, then ask yourself: "Am I doing my very best? Do I have real patrol spirit?"

135. LAWS AND MEN

Why do we have laws? What's the purpose of laws? That's right, we need laws to govern society. To protect life and property and to make rules for the way our society works. If we had no laws, there would be nothing to stop a man from injuring someone weaker than himself or stealing from others. Laws are essential for any civilized society.

But you know, there are laws and laws. For instance, we speak of the laws of nature. Is that some kind of written rule that everything in nature must follow? Not really. It's more like a description of the way the natural world works. The law of nature tells us that predator animals like lions will kill and eat prey animals like wildebeests and antelopes - not because they are vicious but that is nature's way of sustaining her creatures.

Then there's the Scout Law. Are the 12 points of the Scout Law something that must be obeyed or you'll go to jail? Of course not. The Scout Law is a different kind of law. It's a prescription for a good character. But in it's way, the Scout law is just as important as the laws Congress passes because the man who follows the Scout Law will be the best kind of citizen. That kind of citizen tries his best to obey not only the Scout Law but also the laws of his community, state, and nation. Let's now stand and renew our pledge to the Scout Law.

136. MEASURING UP

This month we're learning how to measure heights and distances by estimation. It's fun, and it can be a useful skill in the outdoors - in planning pioneering bridges, for example.

We measure by estimation in lots of everyday things, too. In the morning you estimate how much orange juice you want for breakfast by pouring it into a glass. It's not a precise amount, just approximate. And you measure by estimation when you cross a street well before a car comes or when you pass a football to a running teammate.

One thing most of us don't measure often enough, though, is ourselves. How often do we stop and say, "Am I doing the right thing? Is it what a Scout should do? How am I measuring up to the Scout Oath and Law?" I suggest that you set aside five minutes a week to pause and ask yourself, "How am I measuring up?"

137. HIBERNATION

Does everybody know what the word "hibernation" means? That's right, it means to sleep through the winter. Woodchucks do it. So do some chipmunks, ground squirrels, bats, and some mice. Bears do a lot of sleeping in the winter, too, but they're not true hibernators because they sometimes get up and yawn and look around a little on a warmish winter day.

Did you know that some Scouts are hibernators, too? They're what we call warm-weather Scouts. When the air gets cold and there is snow on the ground they'd rather stay at home than go outdoors as Scouts do.

I hope we don't have any hibernators in this troop. Leave hibernation to the animals who really need to do it because it's part of their life cycle. The most important part of the word "Scouting" is "outing" and in this troop we like to get outdoors rather that try to find our adventures in front of a TV set. Part of the fun of Scouting is learning to live comfortably outdoors all year round. You will find that there is a lot of satisfaction in knowing that you can take care of yourself in any weather. That doesn't mean that we're nuts, though; if we get caught in a blizzard with sub-zero temperatures, we'll come home. But we know how to take care of ourselves in ordinary winter weather.

So you newer Scouts can tell your folks that you'll get along just fine with the troop when we go out later this month. In this troop, Scouting really is outing.

138. YOUR WILD ANIMAL

Scouts, did you know that everybody, including you, has a wild animal behind bars? The wild animal is your tongue, and the bars are your teeth.

If your tongue is not trained it can cause a lot of trouble, not only for yourself but for those around you. Keep those bars of teeth closed until your tongue is so well trained that you know it won't harm anybody.

Your wild animal can make trouble by bad-mouthing other people, by gossip and slander, and by wisecracks at the wrong time. Train your tongue so that it knows the right time to speak and the time to be quiet. Until you have it fully trained, keep that wild animal behind bars.

139. YOUR COOK KIT

Scouts, have you ever heard of people who claim to be able to read your character by the lines in your hand, the shape of your head, or your handwriting. Well, I know a better way. (Hold up a cooking kit. ) All you have to do is look at a Scout's cooking kit.

First you ask, "Is it clean?" Then you ask, "Who cleans it?" Every self-respecting Scout cleans his own kit. He doesn't expect his mother to do it for him.

The next thing to ask is, "Has it been used a lot?" We all know that some mess kits don't get used very often. They're owned by Scouts that some people call "sandwich -wrapped-in-a-pink-napkin" outdoorsmen. I see some of you smiling. Of course, I'm not referring to anyone here.

Then there is the Scout who really uses his cook kit - keeps it clean, too. He can cook with a stick, and he can cook with aluminum foil. In fact he can cook just about any way he wants to and have fun doing it. He's our kind of Scout. You can tell by looking at his cook kit.

140. JUNK FOOD

You all know what junk food is - stuff like potato chips, soda pop and candy. Probably you've heard people say it's not good for you.

I don't think that's really true. Even junk food has some food value. But it is true that a steady diet of junk food is not good because you don't get a balanced diet of vitamins, minerals and protein that you need to grow.

We have what you might call junk food in troop meetings. They're the games we play just for fun - not learn any special skill but just because we enjoy them. There's not a thing wrong with "junk food" games, and I hope you enjoy them as much as most of you do real junk food.

But they're not all of Scouting. In our troop activities we try to give you a balanced diet of Scouting, with some instruction skills and plenty of chances to advance in rank and to learn useful things.

Take advantage of those chances. Don't just enjoy the junk food and leave the rest of the meal.

141. A SCOUT IS OBEDIENT

What's the seventh point of the Scout Law? That's right, "A Scout is obedient. " Our handbook explains it this way: "A Scout follows the rules of his family, school and troop. He obeys the laws of his community and country. If he thinks these rules and laws are unfair, he tries to have them changed in an orderly manner rather than disobey them.

That tells us that some rules and laws may be unfair, doesn't it? perhaps some are, but there must be some reason for them. Think about the reason before you try to change them or ignore them.

This month we're using some rules for water safety. The rules are called the Safe Swim Defense, and there is a good reason for all of them. It's to protect your life.

You may think you should be in a different swimming ability group. Well, if you can prove it, you'll be put in a higher group. But until then, stay with your buddy and your group. Obey our swimming supervisors.

Our rules have only one purpose, to protect you. Remember that when you're in the water.

142. SCOUTS IN ACTION

(Show Boys' Life cartoon feature "A True Story of Scouts in Action")

Did you see this cartoon in this month's Boys Life? it's a story of how a Scout saved a life. I read it every month and I hope you do, too.

In just about every story, the Scout hero showed a lot of guts in making the rescue. But have you noticed that he usually demonstrated some skill, too?

More often than not, in water rescue cases, the Scout here used one of the methods we teach in this troop. Same thing with rescue breathing cases.

The point is, it takes more than guts to save a life. It takes skill - the kind of skill that only comes from practice, practice and more practice.

Maybe you get a little tired sometimes of practicing rescue breathing, or life saving carries, or some other skill over and over again. But remember, each time you should be improving your technique a little bit - and that little bit of extra skill could mean the difference between life and death if you are called upon to use it some day.

143. A SCOUT IS FRIENDLY

Tonight I'm going to tell you a little story that didn't really happen - at least, I don't think it did. It's about a boy named Brian who had just moved into town and hadn't any friends.

One night Brian happened to come by our meeting place and heard us playing. He hung around a while, listening and looking, but he couldn't get up the nerve to come in. I guess he was a little bit timid.

Anyway the next week he was back, hanging around the door. He still couldn't get up his courage to come in and join us.

Brian was just waiting around the door when he saw a Scout coming down the street, heading for our troop meeting. That Scout was you.

That's all the story I'm going to tell. You have to finish it. What happened? Did you brush by him or did you invite him to come in?

144. WORLD FRIENDSHIP

(Read from page 34, The Official Boy Scout Handbook. Refer also to the World friendship Fund kit)

"A Scout is friendly. A Scout is a friend to all. He is a brother to other Scouts. He seeks to understand others. He respects those with ideas and customs other than his own. "

That's what the handbook tells us about the fourth point of the Scout Law. What does it mean? For one thing it reminds us that we have a lot of brothers. Did you know that there are some 12 million Scouts in some 115 countries around the world? Scouting is a lot bigger than our troop, our local council, or even the Boy Scouts of America. It's a worldwide movement of brothers.

Some of those brothers are in poor countries. To help them the Boy Scouts of America has the World friendship Fund, which collects money from American Scouts to buy uniform materials, supplies and equipment, and to train their adult leaders.

Next week, our troop will be making a collection for the World Friendship Fund. You don't have to give a lot. Just contribute one of the quarters you'd use for candy or a video game at the arcade. It will help. Your contribution doesn't have to be a bug sacrifice for you to show your friendship for Scouts around the world. Remember a Scout is friendly

145. EVEN A PARROT

Once a Scoutmaster was visiting in a new Scout's home. He was there to test the boy for his Scout badge. Now it happened that this Scout's family owned a parrot.

Well, one of the requirements for the Scout badge is knowing the motto. The new Scout knew it, of course, and shouted it out: "Be Prepared!"

The next morning the Scout's family was awakened by the parrot screeching, "Be Prepared! Be Prepared!" And for the next few days, until the bird brain had forgotten it, that household resounded with the Scout motto.

Sometimes, we may be like that parrot. If we're asked, "What's the Scout motto?" we're quick with the correct answer. It's easy to remember and say.

But do we ever stop to think of what it means? Perhaps we would be better Scouts if we asked ourselves every day, "Am I prepared?" "Am I growing in the knowledge and skills that will make me a better Scout and a better man?"

Don't be a parrot. Whenever you say the Scout motto - or the Oath, Law, or slogan - think about what they really mean. Then try to give them meaning in the way you live your life.

146. OUR OATH AND LAW

Last week for the Scoutmasters Minute, I talked a little about what Scouting was like a half century ago. You may remember that I said it wasn't very different, at least not in the basics. The Scouts of the Twenties came into Scouting for the same reason you did - to enjoy the outdoors, learn some new skills and to have some fun.

There's something else that is not different: Our Scout Oath and Scout Law. Ever since 1910, more than 75 years ago, boy Scouts have been gathering at troop meetings and repeating the exact same Scout Oath and Law.

I think that's amazing. The world has changed in many ways over 75 years. When Scouting was new, a boy's life was very different. There was no television, no radio, movies were brand new, most people traveled by horse and carriage or train, adults worked long hours six days a week - and so did some kids. It was just a different world.

But the first Boy Scouts in 1910 pledged themselves to the same Scout Oath and Law. And they tried to live by it, just as I hope you do today. Let's think about that as we repeat the Scout Oath and Law. (Lead Oath and Law. )

147. STRENGTHENING OUR TROOP

(Hold up two ropes of different sizes)

Which one of these ropes do you think is stronger? You're right. Common sense tells us that the thicker rope must be stronger.

But how much stronger? Is a half inch rope twice as strong as a quarter inch rope? Sound as if it should be, doesn't it? It's not though. In fact, a half inch rope is four times stronger than a quarter inch rope of the same material.

Why is that? It's because there are more strands in the bigger rope, and each strand helps to make the others stronger. When the strand are laid together in a rope there strength is much, much greater that when they are separate.

Our troop works the same way. If the members of your patrol help each other, then your patrol will be much stronger than if each patrol member does his own thing. And if all the patrols work together when they're doing things as a troop, the whole troop becomes much stronger than if each patrol goes its own way.

So let's share our skills and knowledge as we share the fun of Scouting. Everybody - you, your patrol, and our whole troop - will benefit if we pull together.

148. WORLD FRIENDSHIP

During the coming months we'll be doing some things that remind us of Scouting's past. We'll also try to show you that Scouting is big - worldwide in fact.

More than 100 other countries have Scouting for their boys, too. A lot of those countries in the Scouting brotherhood are very poor.

To help the Scouts of other countries, the Boy Scouts of America has the World Friendship Fund. It supplies them with uniforms and equipment and helps their leaders get training.

Next week at our open house for parents, we will take up a collection for the World Friendship Fund. Of course you don't have to contribute if you don't want to, but if you can spare a quarter it will help a brother Scout in another country.

Remember, that in the Scout Law we say "A Scout is friendly. . . He is a brother to other Scouts. "

149. THE SCOUT TRAIL

When we go hiking we spend most of our time on trails. Sometimes the going is easy because the ground is flat and smooth. Other times it's all uphill - steep and rocky.

The Scout advancement trail is like that, too. Some of the requirements for the skill awards and merit badges are easy for you. Some are tough like an uphill climb with a 40 pound pack.

This month we're going to concentrate on helping each other up those steep , rocky hills to earn skill awards and badges. Why bother? Because by mastering more skills we grow to be a better person, more independent, better able to take our place as a responsible citizen.

Some of us may be slower to advance than others. That's OK. The important thing is that we're all doing our best to make progress. Because if you're not progressing, you're really moving backwards - you're getting behind the rest.

Let's all make up our minds to take a step forward on the advancement trail this month by earning at least one skill award or merit badge. If you're near First Class now, make a special effort to reach it in time for the court of honor.

And let's help at least one other guy over the tough spots on the Scout trail.

150. IT ALL DEPENDS

A lot of you Scouts have been working on the Communications skill award and merit badge, and I hope you've learned the importance of communicating clearly.

(Show walkie talkie. ) With this little device I can throw my voice a half-mile, maybe more. But what good is it if I don't communicate clearly?

Suppose I radioed you on this walkie-talkie and said "Go, man! Trapped in cave. In trouble at Spencer's Mountain. "

Sounds like I'm trapped in a cave at Spencer's Mountain, right? But what if I used exactly the same words but said them like this: "Go! Man trapped in cave-in. Trouble at Spencer's Mountain. "

Quite a different story, isn't it? No doubt you'd rush to Spencer's Mountain if you heard it either way. But would you bring a flashlight and rope to fish me out of the cave? Or would you bring a shovel to dig the other guy out of the cave-in.

As you can see, sometimes a breakdown in communication can be a matter of life and death.

151. MANY GOOD TURNS

Back when Scouting was young, one of our national leaders was Ernest Thompson Seton. He was called the Chief Scout and he often visited troops and asked Scouts about the Good Turns they had done.

He wrote a story about one of his visits in Boys' Life in 1912. To understand the story you have to know that in those days there were no automatic washing machines. Clothes were scrubbed in washtubs and wrung out by a machine called a mangle which you operated by turning a crank.

Seton asked a Scout about any Good Turns he had done, and the Scout said, "I guess I did a good many Good Turns. " He explained, "My mother, she takes in washing, and I turned the mangle, and I guess I gave it a good many good turns. "

The other Scouts laughed, of course, but Seton asked him, "Was it your regular job to turn the mangle, and did you get paid for it?" "No," the Scout said.

Seton replied, "Well, then, you did your good turn all right enough, and one of the very best kind. "

As you can see from this story, the Good Turn has been around for a long time. And it's the same thing it was then - an act of kindness for which you don't get paid.

152. THANKS TO BSA

Last week I told you a little story about a Good Turn and an early leader of the Boy Scouts of America named Ernest Thompson Seton.

There was another well-known leader of Scouting in those days named Daniel Carter Beard. If your grandfather was a Scout, ask him about Dan Beard because he'll remember him. Dan Beard was a legend in Scouting until his death in 1941.

Anyway he often wrote for Boys' Life in those days. I want to read you just a part of his Thanksgiving message to Boy Scouts in 1913.

Dan Beard wrote: "Fellow Scouts: You have more opportunities today, you have more people devoted to your cause, a better chance to become noble, distinguished , brave citizens than ever before in the world's history. A great ancestry, a great history, a great country and the finest boys' organization ever invented. So give three cheers for the Boy Scouts of America, for the Scout Law, and for Old Glory, our flag!"

That was true then and it's true now. Let's give three "Hows and an Ugh!" for the Boy Scouts of America. (Lead cheer)

153. THE SCOUT HANDSHAKE

Our Scout salute and handshake are ancient signs of bravery and respect. During the colonial period of our country, many men carried weapons for protection. Sometimes when they met one another, there was an uneasy moment as each man watched the others right hand. If it went to his sword or his gun, there might be a fight. But if it went to his hat, it was a salute of friendship and respect.

The left handshake comes to us from the Ashanti warriors whom Lord Baden-Powell, the founder of Scouting, knew almost 100 years ago in West Africa. He saluted them with his right hand, but the Ashanti chiefs offered their left hands and said, "In our land only the bravest of the brave shake hands with the left hand, because to do so we must drop our shields and our protection. "

The Ashantis knew of Baden-Powell's bravery because they had fought against him and with him, and they were proud to offer the left hand of bravery.

When you use the Scout salute and handshake, remember that they are signs of respect and courage.

154. RECIPE FOR LIFE

This month you young Scouts are learning something about food and cooking and how to use recipes to whip up a tasty meal. I hope you're learning that following a recipe is vital to good cooking, unless you're satisfied with hot-dogs and hamburgers all the time in camp.

You've probably found out that a pinch of salt, a dash of cinnamon, or a teaspoon of sugar makes all the difference. In fact, everything in the recipe has a reason for being there.

Scouting is like a recipe for living. We call the ingredients our ideals - our Oath and Law, our motto, our slogan. You might say that Scouting's recipe for living calls for a cup of each of the 12 points of the Scout Law, a tablespoon of Good Turns, a heaping cup of duty to God and country, and a couple of dashes of duty to self - that is, physical, mental and moral fitness. Add a quart or two of fun. Mix well and you have good Scouting.

But if we ignore one of the ingredients, the Scouting dish doesn't taste as good as it should. Let's remember that for good Scouting, and a full satisfying life, each of Scouting's ingredients are important.

155. PARENTS

Scouts, if you're like most boys, you don't think of your parents very often. Oh, they're around all the time, of course, and sometimes they make you do things you don't want to do.

But how often do you think of what your parents want from you? Probably not very often. Maybe you give them gifts at Christmas and their birthdays. But most of us don't go out of our way to help our parents as much as we might.

I have a suggestion. Do you know what is the best gift you can give them? I'll tell you.

Parents want most of all, and have a right to expect, that you will do your best to make them proud of you. I don't mean by becoming rich or famous, or even by getting all A's in school - although I hope you do your best at your studies.

The best gift you can give them is to become the best man you can be. There is no better way to do that than by living up to the Scout Oath and Law. That is a gift you can give them right now and all the time, and it is a gift they will cherish above all others.

156. OUTDOOR HOUSEKEEPING

Some of you are working on the Environment skill award or Environmental Science merit badge. You're learning how everything in nature is connected in some way to everything else. Some scientists call it the web of nature. Every strand has connections with other strands. Even rocks, for example, are part of that web because as they slowly disintegrate over hundreds of years they help to form the soil we depend on for food.

You're also finding out that if we pollute or destroy some strand in the web of life, it has effects on other strands. That's why it's so important that we understand what we are doing to nature and why as Scouts we sometimes do conservation projects to help our environment.

What I'm leading up to is a reminder that, especially when we are camping or hiking, we follow Scouting's Outdoor Code in all we do. If we obey that Code, we are not going to damage any strands in the web of life.

Please join me in the Outdoor Code. (Lead Outdoor Code, page 54, Official Boy Scout Handbook, by repeat after me method)

157. JAMBOREE SPIRIT

Thousands of lucky Scouts will be at Fort A. P. Hill in Virginia for the 1989 National Scout Jamboree. We'll have our own troop jamboree next week, but I'm not going to kid you that it will be as spectacular as the national jamboree.

Still we can have plenty of fun ourselves, And we can certainly share in the jamboree spirit.

What's that? Well, the jamboree spirit is the spirit of Scouting and the idea that Scouts everywhere are brothers. . To me at least it's a marvelous feeling to know that all over the country - and in 115 other countries around the world - Scouts like us pledge themselves to the same ideals and purposes that we do. It's a mighty brotherhood and one I'm proud to belong to.

Next week, as we gather for our own jamboree, let's take a moment to think about jamboree spirit and the brotherhood of Scouting. And let's give thanks for our opportunity to be members of that brotherhood and share in the fun, adventure, and service that Scouting offers us.

158. THE BUDDY PLAN

(Hold up buddy tags)

What do I have here, Scouts? That's right, they're buddy tags. We use them whenever we go in the water, so that every Scout is responsible for the safety of another Scout and so the leader knows who is in the water. It's an important way to make sure that no swimmer gets into trouble because no-one is paying attention to him.

The buddy plan is really part of everything we do in Scouting. Remember that in the Scout Oath we say that we will help other people at all times. In other words, we are our brother's keeper, and we pledge to act as a buddy would even to a total stranger.

Maybe I'm stretching the point a little bit, because you're never going to be a real buddy to some lady you might give directions to on the street or to some little kid whose ball you find for him.

Still, the idea of the Good Turn and the buddy plan are the same in a way. Both call for you to help another person - to become your brother's keeper. The buddy plan is absolutely essential when we're in the water and the idea behind it is important in everything we do.

159. CAMPING IN THE TWENTIES

Five months from now - in February - we'll be joining in celebrating the 75th birthday of Scouting in America. Actually, we're going to start celebrating this month.

We'll start by playing some of the games and learning some skills used by Scouts 60 years ago - and even further back. On our campout we'll hike into camp the way they did, and maybe we'll use some of the homemade equipment they did - pots, pans, and dishes from home, for example. Some of you may want to leave your sleeping bags at home, because Scouts didn't have them in those days.

But you know, Scouting's historians tell us that Scouting wasn't all that different from what it is today. The big attractions were in the outdoors, hiking and camping, just as they are today.

So your grandfathers enjoyed the same kind of Scouting that you do. Oh, there are changes, of course. The early Boy Scouts hiked a lot more than we do, but that was mainly because they didn't have access to cars. There were cars on the roads, but not very many.

At home, they didn't find television or video games, and radio was brand new then. In many respects, it was a different world. But Scouting wasn't so different. We are following in their footsteps. Let's see what it was like to be a Scout 60 -odd years ago. It must have been fun, just as it is today.

160. A SCOUT IS BRAVE

In the Scout Law we say, "A Scout is brave. " What does that mean to you? (Get answers. )

Usually we think of bravery as overcoming fear to take some action that saves a life of helps someone in some way. Most of the time we're talking about overcoming fear of physical harm to ourselves.

But there's another kind of bravery. It's bravery to overcome the fear of ridicule from our friends. It's the courage that's required to do what you know is right, even if your friends make fun of you. It may even be tougher than being brave in a crisis because you usually have more time to think about it.

I know it's sometimes hard to act right when everybody is urging you to do something you know is wrong. It takes a courageous Scout - or man - to withstand the pressure from friends.

It's not easy - but it's the mark of a good Scout. Let's try to do our best to be brave in every situation - the emergency and the pressure from friends.

161. COMMUNICATION

Scouts, have you ever considered how important it is to speak clearly and concisely about something so that the other person is in no doubt about what you mean. Sometimes we may have described something accurately but have said it in such a confusing manner that the meaning is totally unclear. Let me explain what I mean with this little and very accurate definition of the game Cricket.

CRICKET - As explained to a foreign visitor.

You have two sides, one out in the field and one in.

Each man that's in the side that's in, goes out and when he's out he comes in and the next man goes in until he's out. When they are all out, the side that's out comes in and the side that's been in goes out and tries to get those coming in, out.

Sometimes you get men still in and not out.

When both sides have been in and out including the not outs.

THAT'S THE END OF THE GAME.

For any of you that know how to play cricket will know that this is a very accurate description. But it gives the other person no idea at all of what the game is about and how to play it. Think before you explain something to be sure you convey your thoughts clearly before you make a fool of yourself and get stumped!

162. A WINNER

A Winner respects those who are superior to him and tries to learn something from them.
A Loser resents those who are superior and rationalizes their achievements.

A Winner explains.
A Loser explains away.

A Winner says, "Let's find a way".
A Loser says, "There is no way".

A Winner goes through a problem,
A Loser tries to go around it.

A Winner says, "There should be a better way to do it".
A Loser says, "That's the way it's always been done here".

A Winner shows he's sorry by making up for it.
A Loser says, "I'm sorry," but does the same thing next time.

A Winner knows what to fight for and what to compromise on.
A Loser compromises on what he shouldn't, and fights for what isn't worth fighting about.

A Winner works harder than a loser and has more time
A Loser is always too busy to do what is necessary.

A Winner is not afraid of losing,
A Loser is secretly afraid of winning.

A Winner makes commitments,
A Loser makes promises.

163. CARRYING SCOUTINGS FLAME

At this moment, somewhere in our country, a Boy Scout is carrying a flame for Scouting. It's called the Heritage Flame, and it will be used to light the opening campfire at the national jamboree next month.

The flame started in Hawaii several months ago, and ever since relays of Scouts have been carrying it eastward toward Washington and Fort A. P. Hill in Virginia where the jamboree will be held. The idea is to draw attention to Scouting on the 75th anniversary of the Boy Scouts of America and to show that Scouting's spirit still burns brightly in this country.

This month we'll have our own Flame Relay, only we call it a Run for Scouting. But you know that each of us carries the flame for Scouting in everything we do. As Scouts we represent the Scouting movement all the time. If we live by the Scout Oath and Law and Scoutings other ideals our flame burns brightly and reflects credit on Scouting, our families and ourselves. When we fail to follow Scoutings ideals - and all of us fail sometimes - our flame flickers low and may die out. It's all up to each of us to carry the flame for Scouting proudly by living up to the principles for which Scouting stands.


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